Monday, 10 July 2017

Keratosis Pilaris

Keratosis pilaris is a common condition where the skin is rough and bumpy. It looks as if the skin is covered in permanent goose pimples.


Keratosis pilaris most commonly affects the back of the upper arms, and sometimes the buttocks and the front of the thighs. Less often, the forearms and upper back may be affected.


How it affects the skin
The patches of affected skin will be covered in tiny spiky bumps, which may be white, red or skin-coloured. This spotting looks like "chicken skin" and the skin feels rough, like sandpaper.
In some people, the skin itches and there may be inflammation and pinkness around the bumps. The skin tends to improve in summer and get worse during winter months or dry conditions.


Who's affected
Keratosis pilaris is very common, affecting up to one in three people. It can affect people of all ages but typically starts during childhood, although it can sometimes occur in babies, and gets worse in adolescence, around puberty. 
Keratosis pilaris sometimes improves after puberty, and may even disappear in adulthood, although many adults still have the condition in their 40s and 50s.


What causes keratosis pilaris?
Keratosis pilaris is hereditary and occurs when too much keratin builds up in the skin's hair follicles. Keratin is a protein found in the tough outer layer of skin, which causes the surface of the skin to thicken, hence the name "keratosis".
The excess keratin blocks the hair follicles with plugs of hard, rough skin. The tiny plugs widen the pores, giving the skin a spotty appearance. It's often associated with other dry skin conditions, such as eczema. 


Treating keratosis pilaris
There's little that can be done to treat keratosis pilaris, and it often gets better on its own without treatment. However, if it's bothering you, the following measures may help improve your rash:
  • use cleansers rather than soap – ordinary soap may dry your skin out and make the condition worse
  • moisturise your skin when it's dry – creams containing salicylic acid, lactic acid or urea are thought to be the most effective
  • gently rub the skin with an exfoliating foam pad or pumice stone to exfoliate the rough skin – be careful not to scrub too hard and rub off layers of skin
  • take lukewarm showers rather than hot baths

You can also seek advice from a medical Skin specialist about treatments available such as:
  • creams containing retinol, which is derived from vitamin A
  • chemical peels
  • microdermabrasion 

For more information contact the Claudia McGloin Clinic on 0719140728. 

Saturday, 25 March 2017

Vitamin C and your Skin

Now that we are coming into spring and the weathers starting to improve, it's time to tackle our winter skin. Many will have noticed that their skin looks tired, dull and lack lustre. This is no surprise after winter weather, fires, heaters and air conditioning.

One of the best ways to tackle dull, tired and lack lustre skin is to add a Vitamin C serum into your daily skin routine. Easy peasy! 

Vitamin C can help to firm and brighten the skin while also evening out uneven skin tone and fading sun spots. 

 

New You by Claudia McGloin has a Professional Strength Vitamin C Serum called C-10. Use daily as part of your skincare routine.

This advanced signature C-10 serum used scientific and evidence based formulas, offering daily antioxidant protection. C-10 contains stabilised L-ascorbic acid which is a form of Vitamin C which is easily absorbed by the skin for greater potency. 

C-10 is one of 8 signature skincare products in the New You by Claudia McGloin Clinic range. 

This range was a finalist for Best Professional Skincare at the My Face My Body Awards in November 2016 in London. 

For more information on New You by Claudia McGloin, contact the Claudia McGloin Clinic direct on 0719140728 or email claudia@claudiamcgloinclinic.com 

Visit our website www.claudiamcgloinclinic.com for more details on all our procedures including our 4 New You by Claudia McGloin Bespoke Signature Facials. 

Sunday, 12 March 2017

Rosacea

Rosacea is a common chronic skin condition that mainly affects the face. It is estimated that approximately 1 in 10 people will suffer from it but many are unaware that they have it. The first sign of Rosacea is often facial flushing. It commonly affects people with fair skin and can affect both men and women. It can occur at any age but typically is noticeable at the age of 30.

People with Rosacea may also experience spots, papules and pustules, persistent redness of their skin. Small blood vessels in the skin can become visible. In the most severe cases, the skin can thicken and enlarge, usually on and around the nose and some people can ecperience eye irritation.

The exact cause of Rosacea is unknown but several triggers have been identified that may make the symptoms worse in some people. These can vary from person to person. These include:

* exposure to sunlight
* stress
* cold weather
* hot drinks
* alcohol
* eating certain foods, such as spicy foods
* dermodex folliculorum (microscopic mite)

There is no cure for Rosacea, but treatments are available to control the symptoms. Treatments for Rosacea include:

* Making lifestyle changes, such as avoiding possible triggers
* Wearing sunscreen can be a good way of controlling the symptoms of facial flushing
* Creams and gels
* Metronidazole
* Azelaic acid
* Antibiotics
* Visible blood vessels associated with Rosacea are known as Telangiectasia. Treatment for Telangiectasia will usually require a referral to a skin specialist.
* IPL treatment
* It may be possible to disguise patches of persistent red skin using specially designed 'camouflage' make-up
* Colonic Hydrotherapy
* Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)



For more information on Rosacea and treatments available, contact the Claudia McGloin Clinic by calling 071 9140728 or send an email to Claudia@claudiamcgloinclinic.com






Stretch Marks

Stretch marks are long, thin streaks or lines that can develop on the surface of the skin and are a form of scarring. Stretch marks are very common and can affect both men and women. Stretch marks cannot be prevented but there are a few tips that can be followed in order to reduce their development.

Stretch marks are medically referred to are Stria or Striae or Striae Gravidarum during pregnancy. Stretch marks don't look alike. They vary depending on how long y...ou've had them, what caused them, the location on your body and the skin type you have.

Areas most often affected by stretch marks are:
* abdomen
* buttocks
* thighs
* arms
* breasts
* shoulders

Anyone can get stretch marks but they tend to affect women more than men with around 9 out of 10 women getting stretch marks during pregnancy. It's estimated that around 7 in 10 women and 4 in 10 men develop stretch marks during puberty.

Stretch marks occur when the skin is stretched extensively over a short period of time. The rapid stretching causes the Dermis (middle layer of skin) to break in places allowing the deeper skin layers to show through forming stretch marks.

The dermis is made up of strong, interconnected fibres that enable your skin to stretch as your body grows. If for example your abdomen grows rapidly over a short period, the fibres can become thin and over stretched and some may break. At that point where the skin fibres break, tiny tears develop which allow the blood vessels below to show through. This is why stretch marks are often red or purple when they first appear.

When the blood vessels eventually contract, the pale coloured fat underneath your skin will be visible and your stretch marks will change to a silvery white colour.

Stretch marks can occur:
* during pregnancy
* as a result of weight gain
* during puberty
* family history
* underlying health conditions
* prolonged medications

Symptoms of stretch marks
Before developing stretch marks the affected skin will become thin, flattened and thin. The area may also feel itchy. Stretch marks often appear slightly raised and may feel wrinkly before eventually flattening out. As the lines become flatter they will start to fade and will change colour. Stretch marks can appear in patches of parallel lines on your body. It can take years to fade and become less noticeable.


At the Claudia McGloin Clinic, we have successfully treated stretch marks using a couple of procedures. For more information call the call direct on 0719140728

Monday, 16 January 2017

Welcome to Skin Secrets!

Skin Secrets by Claudia McGloin is a Blog and a monthly newspaper column that is dedicated to all things skin!

It will offer expert advice and tips while covering a wide range of skin conditions and treatments available.

If there is something in particular that you would like to see covered, please get in touch by sending us a message or emailing claudia@claudiamcgloinclinic.com

More information can be found on our website www.claudiamcgloinclinic.com or on our Facebook page-  https://www.facebook.com/skinsecretsbyclaudiamcgloin/

Hope you enjoy Skin Secrets!

Claudia X